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Using "make"

Introduction

On Linux, Unix, and OS X after you have configured RDM as described in Using "configure", you now need to run make in the configured build directory to compile examples and tutorials.

This step is always required after configure. It will do either a development host build or a cross compile build depending on how the configure script was invoked.

The make files are crafted using the GNU Build system and can be used on any UNIX system. The makefiles themselves do not rely on any GNU Auto Tools to be installed. Everything needed is included in the install. The GNU Auto Tools will only be needed if you edit any of the files that are input to the GNU Build System. Please consult Using "autoreconf" for details.

Setting up an Environment

When RDM has been configured as explained above you may need to set up a development environment as explained in Using "configure".

In the case, you are using the same shell instance from when you ran configure there is nothing more you need to set before running make. The environment you used when running configure should work equally well when you now run make.

Also, if the environment variables you did set prior to running configure are among those that are being captured by the configure script they do not need to be set again in the case you are using another shell instance. This makes it relatively easy to have more than one build environment and access these build environments using one shell. Please see Using "configure" for details.

Running make

Now that you have configured the build directory as explained in the introduction and have a working environment as explained in previous section, you can build the examples and the tutorials by running make:

$ make

Run this to do some simple tests unless you are doing a cross compile using make:

$ make check

For further details, please see the documentation mentioned in the last section.

Next Step

When RDM have been compiled using make you are done unless you are also, going to cross compile using project files.

Cross Compile using Project Files

We are now ready to do a cross compile using project files. This assumes that you did a configure with –enable-_something_-project-files as described in Using "configure" and that the hosted build was successful.

This means that the project files have been configured for a cross compile and the generated source files are present in the build directory. The next step depends on the actual target.

Please note that the project files for any of the cross compiles using project files do not have any rules for building generated source files. These must be produced by the native build using make. Therefore, if you change any of its input files you will need to do a native build again using make before you do the cross compile.

INTEGRITY project files

You did a configure with –enable-integrity-project-files and the next step is to do the actual cross compile build as described in GHS INTEGRITY using Project Files.

QNX project files

You did a configure with –enable-qnx-project-files and the next step is to do the actual cross compile build as described in QNX Momentics 4.7 Platform Release Notes.

VxWorks kernel modules project files

You did a configure with –enable-vxworks-project-files and the next step is to do the actual cross compile build as described in Wind River VxWorks 6.x using Project Files.

VxWorks RTP project files

You did a configure with –enable-vxworks-rtp-project-files and the next step is to do the actual cross compile build as described in Wind River VxWorks 6.x using Project Files.

Additional Help

The make files are crafted using Automake and has a lot of details in them. The description in this document is quite brief. Please check the on-line documentation for the GNU coding standards and Automake for more details here:

https://www.gnu.org/prep/standards/ https://www.gnu.org/software/automake/