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Microsoft Visual Studio Build System

Introduction

On Windows after you have installed RDM as described in README-windows-install.txt you now need to build RDM for Windows to compile examples and tutorials.

Setting up an Environment

Make sure that you have Visual Studio 2013 or later installed. Those installs include a development environment that should work with RDM.

The exact environment we used to build RDM using msbuild is documented in a custom configure script located in its own target sub-directory of the install. Depending on the object package you installed, you will have one or two custom environment scripts like this:

target/windows/env.bat
target/qnx/env.bat

For a host development platform, you will have one such script. For a cross compile there will be two such scripts. One script for the host development platform and one for the cross compiled environment. The scripts contain the exact environment we used for RDM. Make sure that what you use is compatible with this.

Building using Visual Studio

Open the Visual Studio project file in the top-level directory from the file browser, open the solution file from the RDS start menu entry, or run the following command in a command shell:

MSVS Version Command line
Visual Studio 2010 devenv visualstudio2010.sln
Visual Studio 2015 devenv visualstudio2015.sln
Visual Studio 2017 devenv visualstudio2017.sln
Note
For Visual Studio 2017, compile errors may occur if the Windows 10 SDK installed on the host machine does not match the version in the project files provided. For example: error MSB8036: The Windows SDK version 10.0.16299.0 was not found.. This is a known issue that can be resolved by following the instuctions in the following link on Microsoft's Knowedge Base: How to: Use the Windows 10 SDK in a Windows Desktop Application.

The above will open all the Visual Studio project files installed by the RDM installer. One project file for each example and tutorial. From within Visual Studio you can build and run each of these.

Please note that the project file has only two configurations. One for doing a debug build and one for doing a release build. The configurations will either be for Win32 or x64 depending on the actual object package.

Next Step

When RDM have been compiled using Visual Studio you are done unless you are also going to cross compile.

Cross Compile using Project Files

We are now ready to do a cross compile using project files. This means that the generated source files are already present. The next step depends on the actual target.

Please note that the project files for any of the cross compiles does not have any rules for building generated source files. These must be produced by the native build for Windows using Visual Studio. Therefore, if you change any of its input files you will need to do a native build again for Windows using Visual Studio before you do the cross compile.

INTEGRITY project files

The next step is to do the actual cross compile build as described in GHS INTEGRITY using Project Files.

QNX project files

The next step is to do the actual cross compile build as described in QNX Momentics 4.7 Platform Release Notes.

VxWorks kernel modules project files

The next step is to do the actual cross compile build as described in Wind River VxWorks 6.x using Project Files.

VxWorks RTP project files

The next step is to do the actual cross compile build as described in Wind River VxWorks 6.x using Project Files.

Additional Help

The project files have a lot of details in them. The description in this document is quite brief. Please check the on-line documentation for Visual Studio for more details:

https://msdn.microsoft.com/developer-centers-msdn